bookeh by the cheshire smile on Flickr.

bookeh by the cheshire smile on Flickr.

October 20 2014, 12:02 PM   •   3 notes
#nyc  #bookstore  #books  #pics  

Not once did it occur to me that perhaps I’d been an even greater disappointment to her. Sometimes we think people are like lottery tickets, that they’re there to make our most absurd dreams come true.

three books by Liis Klammer on Flickr.

three books by Liis Klammer on Flickr.

October 19 2014, 12:02 PM   •   9 notes

literary-life:

TOP TEN BOOKS
From The Top Ten: Writers Pick their Favorite Books

They asked 125 living authors what their favorite books were, and managed to extract 10 titles. 

How many of these have you read? 

October 19 2014, 10:07 AM   •   13 notes  •   VIA   •   SOURCE

Adventures do occur, but not punctually.

October 19 2014, 10:01 AM   •   3 notes

Life is easy to chronicle, but bewildering to practice.

October 18 2014, 12:02 PM   •   1 note
sailing on words by voldy92 on Flickr.

sailing on words by voldy92 on Flickr.

October 18 2014, 10:01 AM   •   3 notes
#ship  #boat  #words  #book  #film  #window  #screen  #pics  
thenarratologist:

READING LIST: Tuberculosis

Remember how Victorians thought tuberculosis was the ultimate Romantic disease?
In the 1800s, TB (or “consumption” as it was known then) was considered to be a desirable way to die because it was the sign of a delicate, sophisticated soul. Looking like a TB patient even became the height of Victorian fashion; women would paint little veins on the side of their face and drink vinegar in an attempt to bleach their skin and become as pale as possible (as immortalised in this Horrible Histories sketch). In her book Illness as Metaphor, Susan Sontag argues that our current obsession with skinny models is a trend rooted in this consumption craze.
TB was a particularly popular way to kill off characters in nineteenth-century literature. Authors delighted in glorified descriptions of trembling men and women with gigantic dark eyes who had somehow become wiser and even saint-like through their condition (usually glossing over the less attractive aspects like the excruciating pain and the smell).
Read More

thenarratologist:

READING LIST: Tuberculosis

Remember how Victorians thought tuberculosis was the ultimate Romantic disease?

In the 1800s, TB (or “consumption” as it was known then) was considered to be a desirable way to die because it was the sign of a delicate, sophisticated soul. Looking like a TB patient even became the height of Victorian fashion; women would paint little veins on the side of their face and drink vinegar in an attempt to bleach their skin and become as pale as possible (as immortalised in this Horrible Histories sketch). In her book Illness as Metaphor, Susan Sontag argues that our current obsession with skinny models is a trend rooted in this consumption craze.

TB was a particularly popular way to kill off characters in nineteenth-century literature. Authors delighted in glorified descriptions of trembling men and women with gigantic dark eyes who had somehow become wiser and even saint-like through their condition (usually glossing over the less attractive aspects like the excruciating pain and the smell).

Read More

October 18 2014, 08:05 AM   •   145 notes  •   VIA   •   SOURCE

holy CRAP this took me longer than I thought. But Part 2 of my (not-so quick) Quick Notes for Literary Movements. Enlightenment period next. 

October 17 2014, 09:25 PM   •   58 notes

Books are mirrors: you only see in them what you already have inside you.

October 14 2014, 10:02 AM   •   18 notes